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Encryption backdoors prone to criminal abuse


21 Apr, 2016 12:28 pm

Cambridge University's Ross Anderson has said that despite the technology advancements that have led to the development of encryption backdoors, as a means of restricted access they will still be prone to criminal abuse.


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Security experts have been debating the use of encryption backdoors more openly than ever this year due to the FBI v Apple case where the authorities demanded access to a locked device.

Backdoors are typically inserted into encryption products so that approved government spies can hack them.

Cambridge University's security expert Ross Anderson says encryption backdoors also make life easier for cyber criminals

In his role as professor of security engineering at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, Anderson says there is a problem where governments of different countries set conflicting laws, making it impossible for individuals or organisations to comply.
TAKEAWAY TOUGHT
The only clear route out of this type of situation is greater international cooperation and a global harmonisation of data disclosure laws.
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